Meet Our Symposium Speakers #AIBeyondTheMyths

Meet Our Symposium Speakers #AIBeyondTheMyths
September 29, 2017 Chris Button

We are excited to announce our talented panel of speakers for Innovation Symposium: AI Beyond the Myths event as part of Open State 2017.

The October 5 event will delve into the key issues surrounding AI and machine learning, debunking AI myths, and observe how AI is already being used.

RSVPs close for the Innovation Symposium on Tuesday, 3 October. A limited number of registrations are available, so get in quick to ensure you are a part of this high-interest event.

Event Details

Date Thursday 5 October 2017, 9:30am – 1pm ACDT
Location The Science Exchange, 55 Exchange Place, Adelaide, SA 5000

RSVP by Tuesday 3 October 2017

Register now via Eventbrite.

#AIBeyondTheMyths

Open State Innovation Symposium 2017

Our panel of speakers include the following experts and topics:

Mary Hobson, CEO, eRSA

Following careers as a programmer in the British Ministry of Defence, a technology transfer consultancy in Russia, and a variety of Polytechnic sector-related senior academic management roles in New Zealand, Mary joined eRSA in August 2010. Here, she has taken up the reins of operational management of the organisation. At present, Mary is working, with the eRSA team, on strategies to make eResearch effective and ground breaking in South Australia.

Mary will take attendees back to the origins of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and explain why the technology is not the fearsome concept many are wary of. Your expectations of AI may be challenged in this highly informative session.

Dr Leanna Read, Chief Scientist of South Australia

Dr Read brings extensive research, executive, board and investment experience, particularly in biotechnology. Dr Read has led a number of successful research and commercial ventures, including founding a biotechnology company. Her contributions are recognised by a number of prestigious awards, including the 2006 South Australian of the Year (Science and Technology) and the 2011 Central Region winner of the Ernst & Young Entrepreneur of the Year in the Technology Category.

Dr Read will address developments in SA that will take advantage of AI tech.

Professor Lyle Palmer, University of Adelaide, School of Public Health

Professor Palmer relocated to Adelaide from Toronto in 2014 to take up a new opportunity as Professor of Genetic Epidemiology at the University of Adelaide. He is currently leading the creation of several new resources in Adelaide, including the South Australian Family Connections Project. 

In addition to receiving multiple awards including Fulbright and Churchill Fellowships, and being an in-demand speaker internationally, Professor Palmer has extensive experience in constructing and using ‘big data’, particularly linked health data. His research team in Adelaide is focused on using deep learning methods to clinical problems, and is active in producing new software and methods for data analysis and visualisation.

Professor Palmer will present on machine learning in medicine, and how it can be used for better treatment decisions in patients.

Professor Anton van den Hengel, Director, Australian Centre for Visual Technologies (ACVT)

In addition to his directorial role with the ACVT, Prof. van den Hengel is also a Chief Investigator of the Australian Centre for Robotic Vision, and a Professor of Computer Science at the University of Adelaide. He has published over 300 papers, been a CI on over $50m in research funding, and leads a group of over 60 researchers working in Computer Vision and Machine Learning. Prof. van den Hengel has received a number of awards, including the Pearcey Award for Innovation and the CVPR Best Paper Award in 2010.

Prof. van den Hengel’s presentation will be looking at the field of Visual Question Answering, and the new insights it is providing into some of the original challenges of artificial intelligence.

Associate Professor Theresa Dirndorfer Anderson, Connected Intelligence Centre

Associate Professor Theresa Dirndorfer Anderson is Course Director of the Master of Data Science and Innovation in the Connected Intelligence Centre of the University of Technology Sydney. As an information ethicist, she is particularly interested in the interaction between creative and analytic thinking and doing and in examining ways information systems and institutional policies might better support both creative and analytic activities. At UTS this is taking the form of the data science ethics initiatives that CIC is catalysing. to foster meaningful discussion in the academy and in the community about data, AI and ethics.

Associate Professor Anderson will be analysing the ethics of AI, taking a closer look at the decision making processes involved and the role humans play in developing these technologies.

  • "eResearch capabilities ... ensure we can continue to use the latest methods available in our field. The hope is that through the use of these technologies, we will be able to achieve some research outcomes that may otherwise not have been possible.”  
    Professor Ina Bornkessel-SchlesewskyCognitive Neuroscience, UniSA
  • “Open source intelligence is about extracting information from blogs, news sites and social media platforms, any information that can be freely accessed online. There’s way too much information out there for an individual or group of people to comprehend, so we have created automated tools to allow our users to extract the data they need...access to the latest technology allow[s] us to continue to provide the best platforms to our end-users.”
    David BlockowData to Decisions CRC
  • “It would be impossible to do the type of research that we’re doing without them – it is a major factor in achieving our research outcomes.”  
    Associate Professor Con DoolanSchool of Mechanical Engineering, University of Adelaide
  • "The eRSA support is very personal and solution-focused and not just a brushing off 'it's-your-fault-check-your-code' kind of support which one sometimes gets from University tech supports. I very much appreciate the help."  
    Sven SchellenbergSchool of Science, RMIT University
  • “Having access to greater computer power helps us put in place a more realistic model in terms of the number of atoms you can have in the system and that improves the predictive power of the calculations.”
    Professor Andrea GersonMinerals and Materials Science & Technology
  • On using an eResearch program to complete 3D modelling of architectural records: “We were able to build an interactive, photo image model of the [historical South Australian property Joseph Elliot’s cottage] home – transforming simple sketches and floor plans into an interactive 3D experience... what we have now is a computerised model that allows us to experience the Elliott house beyond just words on paper”.
    Associate Professor Christine Garnaut

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